CRO

CRO

A CRO—also called a contract or clinical research organization—is a great asset to the medical field and scientific community, offering services that can help develop medications or medical devices for presentation to the FDA, EMA or other agencies, discover new products or substances, and document ongoing trials or research projects. Some CRO companies are very large and assist scientists and pharmaceutical companies all over the world while others are relatively small and focus on a particular niche, such as cancer research study groups. 
 
Example of a CRO’s Usefulness
 
XYZ Company is a small CRO that deals exclusively with microbiology for scientific research, based out of North America. If this sounds like a limited field without a lot of opportunities, consider the fact that this one area alone deals with bacteriology, virology, mycobacteriology and microbioterrorism studies, to name a few. This gives you just a small idea of how broad spectrum these studies could become, and how beneficial they would be to our society.
 
Now consider a massive CRO giant that specializes in general clinical research, aiding a variety of pharmaceutical and scientific companies around the world. The implications are tremendous, especially if you consider how much one group of individuals could then affect the world in a variety of ways, from the medicines we take to the way the FDA. EMA  and other law enforcement agencies detect viruses or pathogens to threaten our society. 
 
How They Work
 
These organizations help companies in different ways, depending on their area and other affecting factors. Their advantages may include, but are not limited to:
 
Developing or studying drugs and supplements
Consulting with other professionals regarding products or resources
Managing clinical data in a professional, efficient manner
Maintaining quality assurance on clinical studies
Project management for clinical studies
Deciphering and organizing trial results, including biotechnical analyses
Developing medical supplies 
Introducing upcoming medical trials or scientific studies and hypotheses
Providing site feasibility services 
Providing statistics Perform clinical studies 
Monitoring clinical trial safety, from pharmacovigilance to scientific monitoring
Detailing biostatistics and figures for future clinical trials or for providing information to the FDA, EMA and other agencies